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09/03/2015 SEABIRDS "BLIGHTED BY PLASTIC WASTE"

About 90% of seabirds have eaten plastic and are likely to retain some in their gut, a new analysis estimates. The study concludes that matters will only get worse until action is taken to stem the flow of waste to the oceans. Researcher Erik Van Sebille says the oceans are now filled with plastic and it is "virtually certain" that any dead seabird found in 2050 "will have a bit of plastic in its stomach". Dr Van Sebille and his colleagues report their work in the journal PNAS.

09/02/2015 DEMAND FOR MEAT ALTERNATIVES AND SOY PRODUCTS GROWING IN AUSTRALIA

Protein or meat alternatives are proving to be a viable market for Australian growers and manufacturers as more consumers turn to plant-based diets. The alternatives, known as meat analogues, are full of protein and are often substitutes for people who do not eat meat. Dean Epps, general manager of Life Health Foods, Australia's largest manufacturer of analogues, said the demand for protein alternatives that looked and tasted like meat was "coming from people who have aggressively reduced their meat". "Nearly half of Australian adults have actively tried to reduce meat in their diet to improve their health or lose weight," he said. Mr Epps tracks the trends of Australians' meat consumption through independent surveys and comparisons of national studies.

09/01/2015 THE SUMATRAN RHINO HAS GONE EXTINCT IN THE MALAYSIAN WILD

According to a new study, the Sumatran rhino is now considered extinct in the wild in Malaysia. Sumatran rhinos have not been found in Malaysia since 2007, and what are considered to be the last two female rhinos in the Malaysian Borneo were captured and placed into breeding facilities in 2011 and 2014. Researchers estimate that there are now fewer than 100 Sumatran rhinos left in the wild, which are distributed among three populations on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. In order to save the species, researchers suggest that safe regions be implemented where the rhinos can breed, otherwise known as intensive management zones, and place isolated rhinos into these areas so that they can reproduce safely. While Asian governments have approved of these zones in 2013, the researchers say they have yet to establish them.

The number of news found: 3.

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